Biodiversity conservation

 
Many countries including Bangladesh are trying to reverse loss of biodiversity by combating land degradation and improving the soil.

Biodiversity conservation

Land degradation is disastrous for biodiversity. A healthy soil provides nutrients to thousands of micro-organisms and plant and animal species in a region. Species will disappear as a result of soil pollution or a lack of nutrients caused by the fertile upper layer of the soil being removed . Reversing land degradation also improves food security. Many countries are now trying to reverse loss of biodiversity. To identify the most promising conservation practices, large amounts of site-specific data are needed on soil, vegetation, climate, land use and stakeholders (see also Combating land degradation). ISRIC helps to review existing information and create new (soil) data. We thereby seek improvement for farmers too. While scientific experts perceive loss of nature or landscape as a problem, farmers are more concerned about the decline in yields. Consequently, the solutions for the farmers require a different focus. For instance, when farmers build terraces for nature conservation, their efforts also need to result in more money and food. Only then can a solution work.

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Identifying most effective conservation measures for Bangladesh Deforestation is a major cause of environmental degradation including loss of nature in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) in Bangladesh. This is a poor, ethnic diverse region characterized by poverty, soil depletion and forest degradation. To identify the most effective conservation measures, ISRIC participated in the Chittagong Hill Tracts Improved Natural Resources Management. The team developed maps of environmental constraints (erosion and land degradation), actual land cover and social constraints to land management options including forest-land status.